Debris-delayed spacewalk goes ahead as astronauts replace faulty antenna

by | Dec 3, 2021 | International Space Station

After a previous spacewalk attempt on 30 November 2021 was cancelled due to a space debris hazard warning, NASA astronauts Kayla Barron and Thomas Marshburn ventured outside the International Space Station (ISS) on 2 December  on an extra vehicular activity (EVA) spacewalk to replace a faulty SASA (S-band antenna subassembly) on the P1 truss part of the ISS. The antenna had recently lost its ability to transmit low-rate voice communications and data to flight controllers in mission control.

Marshburn was extravehicular crew member 1 (EV 1), wearing a spacesuit with red stripes and who was on his fifth EVA, with Barron as EV 2 in the plain white spacesuit on her first. The spacewalk lasted just under six and a half ours. After being depressurised the Quest airlock hatch was opened at 1114 GMT. Thomas Marshburn actually ventured outside at 1122 GMT followed by Kyla Barron at 1127 GMT. Marshburn and Barron returned to the Quest airlock and closed the hatch at 1743 GMT with a repressurisation occuring shortly afterwards.

All times from NASA via Jonathan McDowell

Astronaut view via spacesuit TV camera during EVA on 2 December 2021. Courtesy: NASA TV

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