Chinese military radar satellite Yaogan 23 is launched by a Long March 2C

by | Nov 17, 2014 | China, Military space | 0 comments

At 1853 GMT on 14 November 2014, a suspected Chinese military radar satellite, Yaogan 23, was launched by a Long March 2C launch vehicle operating from the Taiyuan launch site in China. The satellite is thought to be from the same Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) design as Yaogan 18, buit by the Shanghai Academy of Space Technology.  Officially the spacecraft has a civil use in being used for scientific experiments, remote sensing, and disaster monitoring.  However, Western analysts believe that this SAR satellite really has a military  use.

 

About Seradata

Seradata produce the renowned SpaceTrak Launch & Satellite Database. Trusted by 100 of the world’s leading Space organisations, SpaceTrak is a fully queryable database used for market analysis, failure/risk assessment, spectrum analysis and space situational awareness (SSA).

For more information go to www.seradata.com/spacetrak

Related Articles

All I ask is a tall rocket, and a pad to launch her by.

Hyperbola is a technology orientated spaceflight industry blog that sees Flight technical reporter Rob Coppinger take a, sometimes, wry look Read more

China talks Moon, Russia talks nukes

Hyperbola is a technology orientated spaceflight blog by Flight's technical reporter Rob Coppinger

A nobody claims China will spacewalk next year

Hyperbola is a technology orientated spaceflight blog by Flight's technical reporter Rob Coppinger

China and Russian news

Hyperbola is a technology orientated spaceflight blog by Flight's technical reporter Rob Coppinger

Chinese rush to space death? And news bites for Wednesday 13 March

Hyperbola is a technology orientated spaceflight blog written by Flight technical editor Rob Coppinger

Chinese space walk before October?

Internet reports are qouting a Hong Kong newspaper saying that China's three-man Shenzhou VII spacecraft could be launched in the Read more

IAC 2008: VIDEO – Shenzhou-7 & future of China’s manned programme

Speaking at 0830h on Thursday 2 October Li Ming, an official of the China Academy of Space Technology, gave a Read more

Categories

Archives