Comet Pan-STARRS has now become visible from Northern Hemisphere (Updated)

by | Mar 13, 2013 | Science, Seradata News | 0 comments

Two major comets are due to become visible this year to sky-watchers – clear skies permitting.  The first has now disappeared from view from the Southern Hemisphere, but while viewers there have lost out, “northerners” have gained as Comet Pan-STARRS has now become visible to the naked eye from the Northern Hemisphere.  To see it, look near the crescent Moon in the Western sky after sunset.  The comet will rise further in the sky as the month of March wears on and should become more visible despite starting to move away from the Sun after its perihelion closest approach.  The comet’s tail(s) should be able to be easily seen with binoculars. 

In reaching peak visibility at around the “Ides of March” time (15th March), some may be wondering if the comet is a portent of war or omen of political change as comets have been superstitiously thought to be, 

Comet Pan-STARRS was named after the telescope in Hawaii that was used to discover it. The second of this year’s comets will be Comet ISON which could be more spectacular and may even be visible in daylight during the month of November.

Update: Despite clearing skies, and despite others managing to image Pan-STARRS beneath the Moon near the horizon, your correspondent had no luck in seeing it last night (13th March) in London.  The sky remains bright after sun set making the comet difficult to see.  But cloud is even worse as happened last night (14 March)…still no luck.

About Seradata

Seradata produce the renowned SpaceTrak Launch & Satellite Database. Trusted by 100 of the world’s leading Space organisations, SpaceTrak is a fully queryable database used for market analysis, failure/risk assessment, spectrum analysis and space situational awareness (SSA).

For more information go to www.seradata.com/spacetrak

Related Articles

About Rob Coppinger

Rob Coppinger is a recovering powerpoint user and engineer who mistakenly thought journalism was more glamorous than production engineering. He Read more

T+1 as Hyperbola launches itself far, far above the blogosphere

All things spaceflight industry get linked too and commented on in Hyperbola, the new blog from Flight's technical reporter Rob Read more

On-orbit propellant fever!!

Hyperbola is a technology orientated spaceflight blog from Flight technical reporter Rob Coppinger.

NASA gives public a new Dawn

Hyperbola is a technology orientated blog by flight technical reporter Rob Coppinger

While you’re waiting for that next Shuttle launch…

Hyperbola is a technology orientated spaceflight blog by Flight's technical reporter Rob Coppinger

Romania in space

Hyperbola is a technology orientated spaceflight blog by Flight technical reporter Rob Coppinger

Sputnik week’s first few news bites

Hyperbola is a technology orientated spaceflight blog by Flight technical reporter Rob Coppinger

News bites once more in this historic Sputnik week

Hyperbola is a technology orientated spaceflight blog by Flight's technical reporter Rob Coppinger

Categories

Archives