Moon to look bigger as comes closest to Earth since 1948

by | Nov 14, 2016 | Add category, Science | 0 comments

Astronomers have advised that the Moon will appear larger and brighter in the sky than normal as its orbit will takes it to closest distance from Earth since 1948.

The moon had its closest perigee at 356,509 km (221,524 miles) at 1121 GMT on the morning of 14 November before slowly moving away. The encounter is expected have a significant effect on the oceans’ high tide. Observers can still see it on the evening of 14 November when the Moon will appear to be 7% larger than normal. The next “super moon” close encounter will be on 25 November 2034.

 

About Seradata

Seradata produce the renowned SpaceTrak Launch & Satellite Database. Trusted by 100 of the world’s leading Space organisations, SpaceTrak is a fully queryable database used for market analysis, failure/risk assessment, spectrum analysis and space situational awareness (SSA).

For more information go to www.seradata.com/spacetrak

Related Articles

SPUTNIK 50: Take us round the World one more time, tovarisch

Hyperbola is a technology orientated spaceflight blog by Flight's technical reporter Rob Coppinger

So long Constellation?

Hyperbola is a technology orientated spaceflight blog by Flight's technical reporter Rob Coppinger

UK astronauts: a small step to no-where or a giant leap for the G8 anomaly?

Hyperbola is a technology orientated spaceflight blog by Flight's technical reporter Rob Coppinger

Asian lunar space race!!

Hyperbola is a technology orientated spaceflight blog by Flight's technical reporter Rob Coppinger

China’s Moon, Russia’s Mars and the UK’s origins of the Universe

Hyperbola is a technology orientated spaceflight blog by Flight's technical reporter Rob Coppinger

China talks Moon, Russia talks nukes

Hyperbola is a technology orientated spaceflight blog by Flight's technical reporter Rob Coppinger

News bites from Bilbao, Spain

Hyperbola is Flight´s technical reporter Rob Coppinger´s blog.

Asian lunar love-in

Hyperbola is a technology orientated spaceflight blog by Flight's technical reporter Rob Coppinger

Categories

Archives